Center on Sentencing and Corrections

The Effect of Mental Illness on Segregation Following Institutional Misconduct

The Effect of Mental Illness on Segregation Following Institutional Misconduct

Clark, Kyleigh. “The Effect of Mental Illness on Segregation Following Institutional Misconduct.” Criminal Justice and Behavior 45, no. 9 (September 2018): 1363-382.

People who have been previously diagnosed with a mental illness make up an estimated 37% of people in prison and 44% of people in jail. In many systems, incarcerated people with mental illness are disproportionately put in solitary confinement in correctional institutions. This study examines the effect of mental illness on the likelihood that an incarcerated person is sanctioned with segregation following an incident of misconduct. Its findings suggest that people with mental illness are more likely to be sentenced to segregation than people who do not have a mental illness; they are also more likely to receive segregation sanctions compared to alternative disciplinary responses.

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Key words: administrative segregation, restrictive housing, psychological effects, mental health effects, solitary confinement, disciplinary segregation, mental illness, mental illness and segregation, vulnerable populations

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