Center on Sentencing and Corrections

Previously incarcerated individuals with psychotic symptoms are more likely to report a history of solitary confinement

Previously incarcerated individuals with psychotic symptoms are more likely to report a history of solitary confinement

Ryan, Arthur T., and Jordan DeVylder. “Previously Incarcerated Individuals with Psychotic Symptoms are More Likely to Report a History of Solitary Confinement.” Psychiatry Research (2020), 113064.

This study examined whether previously incarcerated people with self-reported psychotic symptoms were more likely to have been placed in solitary confinement. Researchers surveyed a sample of 176 formerly incarcerated people living in Baltimore or New York City about their experiences in prison and mental health symptoms. Their analysis found that formerly incarcerated people who disclosed having a diagnosis of schizophrenia or psychotic symptoms in the past 12 months were significantly more likely to report a history of solitary confinement while incarcerated. This finding supports other research that suggests people with a psychotic illness are disproportionately represented in restrictive housing.

Click here to view the report.

Keywords: mental illness, schizophrenic, diagnosis, SMI, serious mental illness, WHO, paranoia, delusions, thought manipulation, hallucinations, restrictive housing.