Center on Sentencing and Corrections

Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities

Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities

Jennifer Lutz, Mark Soler, and Jeremy Kittredge. Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities. Washington, DC: Center for Children’s Law and Policy and the Justice Policy Institute, 2019.

 

This report, released by the Stop Solitary for Kids campaign, highlights “specific examples and lesson learned from four jurisdictions: Colorado, Massachusetts, Oregon, and Memphis, TN. This first-of-its-kind report is a roadmap to help administrators and staff answer the question, ‘If not isolation, then what?’ in ways that are developmentally appropriate and improve overall outcomes for kids.” The report demonstrates to advocates, policymakers, and other stakeholders that it is “possible to safely stop the use of room confinement for young people, and everyone.” “Not in Isolation: How to Reduce Room Confinement While Increasing Safety in Youth Facilities,” shares “specific actions that worked; quotes and perspectives from staff; sample forms and policies; and data to confirm that we can reduce and eventually end isolation in all types of youth facilities.”

 

Click here to view the full report and download a pdf.

Click here to view the executive summary.

Click here to visit the Not in Isolation homepage for additional resources.

 

Keywords: kids, children, youth, juveniles, solitary confinement, room confinement, isolation, Not in Isolation, Stop Solitary for Kids, Colorado, Massachusetts, Oregon, Memphis