Center on Sentencing and Corrections

Association of Restrictive Housing During Incarceration with Mortality After Release

Association of Restrictive Housing During Incarceration with Mortality After Release

Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren, Josie Sivaraman, David L. Rosen, David H. Cloud, Gary Junker, Scott Proescholdbell, Meghan E. Shanahan, and Shabbar I. Ranapurwala. “Association of Restrictive Housing During Incarceration With Mortality After Release.” JAMA Network Open 2, no. 10 (2019).

Previous research associates the restrictive conditions of confinement—also known as solitary confinement—with poor health outcomes. This study included 229,274 people released from incarceration in North Carolina from January 2000 to December 2015. Researchers matched incarceration data with death records from January 2000 to December 2016. Compared with individuals who were incarcerated and not placed in restrictive housing, individuals who spent any time in restrictive housing were 24% more likely to die in the first year after release, especially from suicide (78% more likely) and homicide (54% more likely); they were also 127% more likely to die of an opioid overdose in the first 2 weeks after release.

Click here to view the article.

Keywords: health, homicide, incarceration, mental health, restrictive housing, segregation, solitary, mortality, suicide, substance abuse, opioid, overdose.