Center on Sentencing and Corrections

Craig Haney, PhD

Craig Haney, PhD

Prof. Craig Haney is a distinguished professor of psychology and the director of legal studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In 1971, he served as one of the principal researchers on the highly publicized “Stanford Prison Experiment.” Since then, Prof. Haney has been studying the psychological effects of living and working in prison environments, and many of his analyses of those issues appear in his widely praised book Reforming Punishment: Psychological Limits to the Pains of Imprisonment (published by the American Psychological Association in 2006, and nominated for a National Book Award).

Prof. Haney’s work has taken him to numerous maximum security prisons across the United States and in several different countries, where he has evaluated conditions of confinement and interviewed prisoners about their mental health and other consequences of incarceration. In the late 1970s, Prof. Haney began to study the unique psychological effects of solitary-type confinement and, over the last several decades, he has conducted systematic, in-depth assessments of representative samples of hundreds of prisoners in segregation in a number of different states. He has served as an expert witness in several landmark cases addressing the constitutional rights of prisoners, including Toussaint v. McCarthy (1983), Madrid v. Gomez (1995), Coleman v. Gomez (1995), Ruiz v. Johnson (1999), and Brown v. Plata (2011).

In 2012, Prof. Haney was appointed to a National Academy of Sciences committee studying the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the United States and also testified at a historic hearing before the U.S. Senate, examining the nature and effects of solitary confinement. In 2014, Prof. Haney was selected as the distinguished faculty research lecturer at University of California, Santa Cruz. Prof. Haney holds a PhD and JD from Stanford University.